Bath Time: A Spa Inspired Bath
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Bath Time: A Spa Inspired Bath

We all dream about those perfect vacations when an afternoon spent cloaked in a soft bathrobe after a hot bath feels good, rather than guilty. Well, imagine having that luxury every evening, after a long day’s work. It’s possible–and it doesn’t have to cost you your kids’ college funds to get it. Making simple adjustments to your everyday bath can yield a big impact. Just follow these quick tips for upping the zen factor in your space:

  1. Minimize clutter. Leonardo da Vinci once wisely said, “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” When it comes to the bathroom, this mantra is right on. While the tendency may be to decorate the bath in the same way you would your home, it’s best to steer clear and stick to simple, minimal décor. Another tip: store unsightly bottles of shampoo and toothpaste away in a drawer. This will reduce the visual noise and make your bath look instantly cleaner.
  2. Bring the outdoors in. Fresh plants and flowers act as a natural air freshener in a room. Plus, they’re calming to look at and, therefore, the perfect accessory to a spa-inspired bath. Try sweet and subtle varieties, such as a small shrub or plant with deep green leaves or, if you’re more into florals, a single orchid or a small handful of cherry blossoms.
  3. Let there be (adjustable levels of) light. You should be able to control your bath’s brightness based on how you’re using it. Recessed lighting with a dimmer switch is ideal, however, if swapping out the fixtures in your bathroom isn’t an option, bring alternate sources inside. Simple sconces or hanging lanterns provide ample lighting for your morning routine, while a string of candles around the bath coupled with natural light streaming in are the perfect accompaniment to an evening bath. Outfit all fixtures with frosted bulbs, too, as they give off less glare than clear ones.
  4. Use soft, calming colors in earthy tones. Walls and floors should be kept a neutral beige or, if you’re bold, a deeper brown, green or gray hue. Look to nature when choosing complementary colors: Just as a sprouting lavender-colored orchid adds a hint of color to a garden, subtle pops of soft floral hues can be incorporated here.
  5. Juxtapose organic materials for visual interest. Wood and stone are popular options for walls and flooring but, if your budget doesn’t allow for that much of an overhaul, consider incorporating things like an in-shower or bathside teak stool, reflection ball, or clear glass hurricane filled halfway with pebbles. Another idea: craft your own pebble bath mat (like this one from from Viva Terra) using our super-easy steps below. Your feet will love you for it!

Treviso_DV00-400w

DIY Pebble Bath Mat

What you’ll need:

  • One rubber doormat (you can also use rubber shelf liner if you want to cut your own size mat, but it will be flimsier)
  • 1-2 bags of river rocks (available from the garden center at your local home improvement store)
  • Landscape adhesive

Directions:

  1. Wash the rocks with soap and water to remove any dust or film.
  2. Arrange the rocks on the mat to your liking. Try and find a way that minimizes the amount of space between each rock. Also, create a contrast of colors by spreading the darker shaded stones around the mat, rather than clustering them all together.
  3. Starting from the center, pick up each rock and apply roughly a dime-sized amount of adhesive directly to the mat. Replace the rock atop it and hold down for several seconds.
  4. Repeat with all remaining rocks, working toward one corner at a time to keep from losing your place.
  5. Once complete, allow the mat to set for at least 24 hours in a safe, dry place away from any potential disruption.

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Enjoy after a serene bath or shower!

0 0 3404 15 December, 2011 Bath December 15, 2011

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